Author Q&A: The Mapmakers’ Race – Eirlys Hunter with Julia Eccleshare

I am delighted to host this Q&A between Eirlys Hunter, author of The Mapmaker’s Race and Julia Eccleshare, one of children’s literature leading figures and currently Editor-at-Large with LoveReading4Kids.
In this blog post, Eirlys discusses writing for children, and the differences between that and writing for adults; her Welsh heritage (which is pretty apt to appear on my blog with being Welsh myself) and writing fantasy stories.

Eirlys Hunter and Julia Eccleshare are schoolfriends who both ended up in the children’s book world—on opposite sides of the world. On the release of Eirlys’ first children’s novel in the UK, The Mapmakers’ Race, we asked them to have a small conversation about children’s books.

Eirlys Hunter is a London-born fiction writer who lives in Wellington, New Zealand. She has published seven books for children as well as a novel and short stories for adults. Hunter teaches Writing for Children at the International Institute of Modern Letters at Victoria University (New Zealand’s most prestigious creative writing school).

Julia Eccleshare is a journalist and writer on children’s books, and the former children’s book editor for the Guardian. She published 1001 Children’s Books You Must Read Before You Grow Up in 2009.

‘I’ve known Julia since we were three, but we became close friends when we were in the same classes in years 12 & 13. We had holidays at her parents’ cottage in Wales and used to go for long walks across the hills, talking about books.’ —Eirlys Hunter

JE: You grew up in the UK in what was thought of as ‘a golden age of children’s literature’. Do you think that influenced your decision to become a writer, especially your decision to write for children?

EH: I’m sure it did, though of course I had no idea of how lucky I was. The children’s library up the road had a constant stream of exciting new books and my sister and I had Alan Garner, Joan Aiken, Philippa Pearce, Susan Cooper, William Mayne, Leon Garfield and Rosemary Sutcliff on our bookshelf.

Nowadays, reading adult novels gives me intellectual pleasure, but for emotional satisfaction and total immersion in another world I still prefer reading children’s books. I have written for adults and I may do again, but when I write for children I feel connected to the period in my life when stories were the only thing that mattered.

JE: Apart from the obvious things about what the characters are able and allowed to do, can you identify any differences between writing for adults and writing for children?

EH: You can write about any subject for children, but there are differences between how you write for children and adults (and by children, I mean pre-teens—writing for young adults is something else again). Of course, there are exceptions to undermine every generalisation, but for me the most important feature of a book for children is that it should have a child’s eye at its centre.

This probably means a child, or a childlike character, but it also means a sense of wonder. So much of children’s experience is new, extraordinary and inexplicable, and children’s writers have to reflect that.

Also, adult readers may be prepared to wade through pages of introspection, but children usually aren’t. Child characters may be thoughtful or dreamy, but they shouldn’t spend a lot of time reflecting until they’re teenagers. Children in books have to be active; they have to be doing.

And children’s books must end, if not entirely happily, at least hopefully.

JE: Does your Welsh heritage and your love for the remote Welsh countryside ever provide a landscape for your stories?

EH: Often! Setting is so important; it provides a mood as well as a stage for the action. There is a small corner of Wales that is in my DNA and I can’t keep out of my writing. The Mapmakers’ Race isn’t set in a named country but the landscape is a blend of the South Island of New Zealand and Snowdonia in North Wales.

JE: When did you discover you were a storyteller and writer? Did you start by writing for your own children or do you write to entertain yourself?

EH: I write because it’s an addiction. I used to make small books, and my parents must have noticed because they gave me an ancient typewriter for Christmas when I was ten. I began my first novel, painstakingly clacking out each letter, but it took two long pages for my heroine to get dressed and have breakfast; I wanted to write a realist novel but had no idea how to skip the reality of toast and tooth-brushing. In my teens I wrote poetry, and what I thought of as scenes—they were short stories really. It was a surprise to be praised for these at secondary school, because in primary school my writing was only ever singled out for poor spelling and wonky margins. As a teenager I kept a diary full of high emotion, and for many years I wrote to find out what I thought and felt.

I started writing for an audience when the last of my four children went to kindergarten, and I wrote for children rather than adults because that’s what I knew best; that’s what I’d been reading most of for so long. And children’s books tended to be shorter and seemed more manageable. I did try to write one novel specifically for my son, but the whole process took so long that he was practically grown-up by the time it was in print. I’d say that I was inspired by my children, but really I write for myself, because I have to.

JE: Do you imagine yourself in stories? In which case, which character from a children’s story would you most like to be?

EH: I always imagined myself in stories when I was young, sailing with Nancy and Peggy,
or languishing in the attic with poor Sarah Crewe. When I was older I spent a long time being Cassandra Mortmain in I Capture the Castle. Now I’d most like to be Lyra Belacqua or Malcolm Polstead, Philip Pullman’s brave, loyal, quick-witted heroes. Or, on less adventurous days, I’d like to be Orlando the Marmalade Cat.

JE: Writing fantasy novels for children has been very popular for the last 20 years, not least because of the success of JK Rowling. What is so attractive about writing fantasy and what opportunities does it give a writer?

I think many writers have been forced into writing fantasy because the reality of most contemporary children’s lives is so boring. They’re driven everywhere, closely timetabled and monitored, and spend so much time looking at their screens. Writers write fantasy because it’s the only way to get rid of the adults in a child’s life without causing major trauma (not that there’s anything wrong with writing about trauma, but then it’s trauma that drives the story). Fantasy may also be the only way to give child characters time to muck about and observe the world, and the opportunity to explore and take risks.

It’s impossible to imagine a contemporary realist novel in which the children have the kind of adventures that were standard in stories of a generation ago. Child welfare agencies would be called in if any contemporary children were observed to be unsupervised
for whole days at a time like the Famous Five or the Swallows and Amazons (and they didn’t wear life jackets!). It seems that only neglected children are free to have real world adventures nowadays. If a writer wants to give their child characters agency and a happy, functional family they have to write fantasy. (Historical fiction can serve the same purpose, but that involves research. I prefer making it all up.)

Fantasy doesn’t only allow child characters autonomy, it also gives writers autonomy.
I’ve been struggling with a contemporary YA novel in which social media is crucial,
but technology and the way it’s used by teens changes faster than I can keep up. In
The Mapmakers’ Race I not only ditched the parents but was free to ditch any aspect of contemporary life that limited my characters’ experience, or that I found hard to imagine, or intrinsically uninteresting. My children lose their mother on page one, but no one intervenes. They must manage without money or any means of communication. They have the technological skills they need for the race but soon discover just how many life-skills they’re missing. But they survive, and grow, and have fun.


The Mapmakers’ Race is out now in paperback (£6.99, Gecko Press)

Find out more at www.geckopress.com and on Twitter: @geckopress


Thanks to Laura Smythe for inviting me to host this exclusive and very enjoyable interview for this brilliantly-written book.

Mr E
📚

Blog Tour (Review): Baker Street Academy: Sherlock Holmes and the Baker Street Curse – Sam Hearn

image001
‘A highly engaging mystery… Sherlock is no doubt one of our nation’s favourite detectives and I can guarantee that this young Sherlock will be one of our young nation’s favourite detectives to read about.’

Rating: ⭐⭐⭐⭐

Title: Baker Street Academy: Sherlock Holmes and the Baker Street Curse
Author & Illustrator: Sam Hearn
Publisher: Scholastic (@scholasticuk)
Page count: 160
Date of publication: 2nd August 2018
Series status: Second in the series
ISBN: 978-1407164069

Perfect for Year 3, Year 4 & Year 5.

#3Words3Emojis:
1. Mystery ⁉️
2. Ghosts 👻
3. Riddle 📜


The game is afoot! The mystery has begun (again)!

Sherlock, John and Martha are back for a new term at Baker Street Academy when they notice there’s something spooky about their school…

Can Sherlock uncover the mystery of the Baker Street ghost? Or are they all (gulp!) cursed…


Review: Sherlock, Watson, Martha are back to business in Sherlock Holmes and the Baker Street Curse, by Sam Hearn, the second book in the exciting Baker Street Academy series which will really appeal to budding young detectives and smaller Sherlocks themselves.

A highly-engaging and interesting mystery adventure for younger readers, Baker Street Curse is a delightful read for both parents (many of whom will already be Sherlock fans, who will recognise subtle references to the original stories) and children alike to read together, and also for older readers to read independently. Told through Watson’s diary, and fully illustrated throughout in a graphic novel-style format with comic-strip illustrations bursting with life, Sherlock, Watson and Martha find themselves in the middle of the most spookiest and strangest of goings-on in their school with ghosts, a long-lost curse and a riddle that takes some Sherlock-solving to get their teeth into!


But will they find out what is going on before it is too late?


It’s a great mystery that is easy to follow with some red herrings, plot twists and historical facts scattered along the way that’ll lead readers slightly astray but also bring them closer to the solution, whilst also being supported by a brilliant cast of characters that help to bring the adventure to life. For young Sherlock is just as sharp, astute and observant as we know his older character to be portrayed, and the resolute Watson and the confident Martha add a fantastic friendship dynamic that will have every young reader wanting to be Sherlock, Watson or Martha in their very own sleuthing squad.

First in the series, Sherlock Holmes and the Disappearing Diamond Mystery was one of the winners of The Fantastic Book Awards – Children’s Choice for ages 9-11, judged by children in Lancashire, and I’m sure that this sequel will also be in the running for many awards to come. I am already hoping that there’ll be a third in the series to follow and I could really imagine this series of books being made in to an animated TV series.

These Baker Street Academy books provide the perfect, modern introduction to middle-grade mysteries and to Arthur Conan Doyle’s classic characters. Sherlock is no doubt one of our nation’s favourite detectives and I can guarantee that this young Sherlock will be one of our young nation’s favourite detectives to read about.


‘A highly engaging mystery… Sherlock is no doubt one of our nation’s favourite detectives and I can guarantee that this young Sherlock will be one of our young nation’s favourite detectives to read about.’


Big thanks to Emily Burns and Scholastic for sending me a copy of this book and for inviting me to join in with the blog tour.

Mr E
📚


Baker Street Curse is available to order now online or from any good bookshop.

image001


First in the series, Disappearing Diamond Mystery is also available to order now online or from any good bookshop.

BHBBO

Blog Tour (Review): A Chase in Time – Sally Nicholls (Illustrated by Brett Helquist)

Repro_AChaseInTime_cvrHIGHRES
‘Like Downton Abbey meets Back to the Future… A Chase in Time is a breathless blast to the past that’ll leave you wanting to read more of this series and more of Sally Nicholls!’

Rating: ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐

Title: A Chase in Time
Author: Sally Nicholls (@Sally_Nicholls)
Illustrator (Cover): Brett Helquist (@BHelquist)
Publisher: Nosy Crow (@NosyCrowBooks)
Page count: 208
Date of publication: 2nd August 2018
Series status: First in the series
ISBN: 978-0857638984

Perfect for Year 3, Year 4 & Year 5.

#3Words3Emojis:
1. Time-travel ⏰
2. Mirror 🖼️
3. Cup 🏆


Alex Pilgrim is always up for adventure, so he’s super-pleased when he and his sister, Ruby, fall through their aunt’s mirror into 1912. Racing around in a scarily dangerous car, being permanently grubby and even catching a criminal or two is great fun! Now they just need to find a way to get home…


Review: Prepare to wear your finest knickerbockers, petticoats and bodices as you race back in time for this riotously-good, time-travelling read that’s like Downton Abbey meeting Back to the Future.

Alex and his sister, Ruby, are sent away to their aunt’s house for the summer holidays but this is no ordinary house as they are yet to find out for themselves… At first, it’s not looking good for Aunt Joanna as she reveals that she will have to sell her stately home as she can’t afford to keep it anymore. But can the past of Applecott House help towards its future? Only time will tell…

As Alex is suddenly drawn to a mirror that’s always been hanging in the corridor of his aunt’s house, he and Ruby find themselves to be transported in to another seemingly surreal world as they explore the Edwardian era thanks to the powers of the priceless family heirloom that becomes a portal and a passageway to their past. Luckily for them, they recognise that it’s the same house… but it’s an altogether very different (and rather exciting!) place to live as they get caught up in all kinds of ancestral adventures including vintage car-chases, antiquated traditions, theft, arson and more as they have to take on the role of time detectives to help solve the problem of a golden cup that’s gone mysteriously missing…

Sally provides a great deal of accurate and precise historical detail such as an authentic cast of characters and snippets of social history, which are perfectly complemented by Brett’s classical illustrations that are so much in keeping with the time period that it felt like they were really turning back the clock. The backdrop to the book becomes the early-twentieth century before the First World War, as it’s set mostly in 1912, and spans between the differences of then and now. There’s moments in the story when Alex and Ruby reveal what is yet to come for the characters (I’m sure you can predict what’s to come in the future years) and I admired this reflective moment within the book’s fast-paced nature.

But will the siblings find a way out of the bygone days and back home?

I particularly liked how, towards the end of the story, the use of the past and the present come together. It will make you lose track of time – but it will be time that will be very well spent – as you chase down the mystery of the golden cup and join Alex and Ruby on an adventure that they thought they’d never experience. I’m sure they’ll be eager to go back to Applecott House next summer, I know I would be!

After Things a Bright Girl Can Do and her short story, Out for the Count in Make More Noise, it’s safe to say that Sally Nicholls is soon becoming one of the leading lights to look out for in children’s historical fiction. This is another really intriguing and interesting novel from a brilliant writer that readers of all ages, particularly those moving on to chapter books, will enjoy that showcases and highlights what life would have been like in Edwardian England at the time.

Like a breathless blast to the past, this one is sure to leave you wanting more of this series and wanting to read more of Sally Nicholls.

‘Like Downton Abbey meets Back to the Future… A Chase in Time is a breathless blast to the past that’ll leave you wanting to read more of this series and more of Sally Nicholls!’


Big thanks to Siân Heap and Nosy Crow for sending me a copy of this superbly-written book and for inviting me to join in with the blog tour.

Mr E
⏰📚⏰

You can take a sneak peek and read the first chapter of A Chase in Time on the
Nosy Crow website.

A Chase in Time is available to order now online or from any good bookshop.

Repro_AChaseInTime_cvr.indd


A Chase in Time - Twitter Banner - Blog Tour v1.1
Be sure to check out the other dates and other bloggers for more reviews, posts and exclusive content from Sally Nicholls and Nosy Crow on the A Chase in Time blog tour this week!

Blog Tour (Review): Knights and Bikes – Gabrielle Kent (Illustrated by Rex Crowle)

KNIGHTS AND BIKES
‘Fast-paced, fun and full of adventure with friendship at its heart, Knights and Bikes is the kind of wheelie-good book that you’ll want to read all day and all (k)night!’

Rating: ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐

Title: Knights and Bikes
Author: Gabrielle Kent (@GabrielleKent)
Illustrator (Cover): Rex Crowle (@rexbox)
Publisher: Knights Of (@_KnightsOf)
Page count: 256
Date of publication: 1st August 2018
Series status: N/A
ISBN:978-1999642501

Perfect for Year 3, Year 4 & Year 5.

#3Words3Emojis:
1. Knights ⚔️
2. Bikes 🚲
3. Friendship 👭


Welcome to the sleepy island of Penfurzy, where nothing exciting ever really happens. OR DOES IT?

Adventure awaits Demelza and her new best friend in the whole world, Nessa, as they explore the island and uncover the mysteries of the Penfurzy Knights. With a honking pet goose sidekick, quirky islanders and a legendary treasure to find, it’s up to Nessa and Demelza to ride their bikes, solve the puzzles before them, and face down danger with frisbees, water-balloons, feathers …. and a toilet plunger.


Review: Knights and Bikes, based on a soon-to-be released crowd-funded video game of the same name, is the tale of two girls who become the bestest of friends whilst taking part in exciting, yet mysterious, treasure-hunting adventures on the island of Penfurzy – a fantasy world that any reader themselves would want to adventure in. Within the pages of this book, Gabrielle puts her own stamp on the world of the game ensuring it stays its own story: spoiler-free and original by adding in additional adventures for its characters.

Demelza, the daughter of a caravan park owner and living in her own caravan, lives a very uneventful life on the likewise uneventful island. That is until she – unconventionally – meets Nessa, a girl who at first appears to be a threat, crashing and banging through her door in the middle of the night, but soon becomes her trusty friend. As the pair (plus their pet goose, Captain Honkers who gives some mighty ‘HOOONNNKs’ to welcome readers at the start of the story just to be sure of the name) embark on all kinds of adventure whilst following in the footsteps of her mother before her, they find out what the island really has to offer as it reveals itself, its legends and its long-lost curse. Penfurzy ends up becoming an island that both Demelza and Nessa don’t want to leave behind, and I’m sure the same will be said by all of Knights and Bikes’ readers too.

Older readers will recognise a sense of 80s’ film and popular culture references (boom-boxes included!) that may make them feel rather nostalgic at points; reminiscing about their own childhoods.

Coming from a recently-launched start-up publisher Knights Of (with one goal in mind: to  publish brilliant commercial kids books with one BIG difference – creating an inclusive, diverse, fairer team to make them), there has been increasing speculation and attention directed at Knights and Bikes. So therefore it is with great delight that after reading Knights and Bikes to find that this attention and praise, on my part and many others, is thoroughly deserving and well-warranted.

As the story progresses, it is fantastic to witness the growing bond between Demelza and Nessa as they become more than just friends and more like sisters, or should I say ‘spit sisters‘. Fast-paced, fun and full of adventure with friendship at its heart, Knights and Bikes is the kind of wheelie-good book that you’ll want to read all day and all knight! With the end of the story suggesting that are plenty more quests to come, Knights Of is a publisher that is one to most definitely look out for.

I’ll end this review with a direct quotation from the book as it sums it up perfectly. Sometimes you find the best adventures. But sometimes ‘the best adventures find you‘ and that is what Knights and Bikes is all about. A book with the very best kind of adventure that deserves to find its way to many, many readers and the same could be said of its publishers, Knights Of.

‘Fast-paced, fun and full of adventure with friendship at its heart, Knights and Bikes is the kind of wheelie-good book that you’ll want to read all day and all (k)night!’


Huge thanks to Sian for inviting me to take part in this blog tour and all at Knights Of for sending me a ‘limited edition advance proof’ copy of this fantastically-written book!

IMG_9926.jpg
Mr E
⚔️📚🚲


Knights and Bikes is available to order now online or from any good independent bookshop.

Knights and Bikes cover

Cover Reveal: Gangster School 2: The Brotherhood of Brimstone – Kate Wiseman

Today, I’m absolutely delighted to exclusively reveal (with My Book Corner) the cover of Kate Wiseman’s second instalment of the Gangster School series, The Brotherhood of Brimstone which will be published on 31st August 2018 by ZunTold.


Gangster School 2: The Brotherhood of Brimstone – Kate Wiseman

final cover v09

Trouble is brewing at Blaggard’s School for Tomorrow’s Tyrants.

Sir Byron’s Brain, a priceless legendary diamond, has gone missing. If it leaves the school grounds, Blaggard’s will be destroyed forever and the head teacher obliterated!

Could the evil Brotherhood of Brimstone – an ancient secret society – have anything to do with it? Best friends Milly and Charlie embark on an adventure to find out. They discover a web of evil plots involving Gruffles, Charlie’s stinky dog, and Wolfie, the robot dog turned invisible superhero.

On top of this, Blaggard’s is expecting a school inspection from the mysterious Dr X – Chief Inspector of Criminal Schools. He could turn up at any time, and no one knows what he looks like.

Time is running out for Milly and Charlie. Will Dr X appear? And can our heroes defeat the evil Brotherhood, rescue their canine companions and save the day?

The rollicking second instalment in Kate Wiseman’s Gangster School series.

Publisher: ZunTold
ISBN: 978-1999863326
Number of pages: 212


Kate Wiseman (@KateWiseman)

(Photo credit: https://katewiseman.uk)

Kate is a children’s writer. She lives in Saffron Walden with her husband, her son (when he’s home from university) and three neurotic cats. One of her cats, Maisie, is actually a ghost cat now, but Kate still talks to her every day.

Kate was a late developer. Before going to university at the age of 38 to study creative writing, she did lots of different jobs ranging from working in a library to promotions work. When she grew up a bit she worked in schools, doing everything from mopping up sick to judging poetry competitions. She graduated from uni with a First and annoyed her family and friends by bringing it into every conversation for a Very Long Time.  She also has a Masters in English Literature, which she took while she was trying to gather the courage to write children’s fiction.

Her claims to fame include winning a prize in a Halloween competition that she hadn’t even entered – “I was just standing there, looking at the costumes,” having criminal ancestors who were hanged and fainting onto a famous film director in a London theatre.

When she’s not fainting on the famous or scaring people with her witchy looks, she writes about Blaggard’s School for Tomorrow’s Tyrants, the world’s best school for trainee criminals. The idea for Blaggard’s originated with her son, who used to say that when he grew up he wanted to be an evil genius. He’s now studying history, so perhaps the world is safe. Or is he just biding his time…..?


Isla Bousfield-Donohue (@squgcreative)

(Photo credit: https://twitter.com/squgcreative)

Isla Bousfield-Donohue is a young artist from Manchester designed the cover for Gangster School 2: The Brotherhood of Brimstone and Gangster School.


Huge thanks to Kate and all at ZunTold for inviting me to host this brilliant cover reveal, I can’t wait to get my hands on a copy!


Mr E

📚


Gangster School 2: The Brotherhood of Brimstone is available to pre-order online from AmazonWaterstones or from any good bookshop.

final cover v09


Gangster School  is available to pre-order online from AmazonWaterstones or from any good bookshop.

518fJooEtQL._SX332_BO1,204,203,200_

Cover Reveal & Giveaway: The Dodo Made Me Do It – Jo Simmons (Illustrated by Sheena Dempsey): Out 9th August 2018!

Today, I’m SO excited to reveal the cover of Jo Simmons’ fabulously funny, The Dodo Made Me Do It, illustrated by Sheena Dempsey, which will be published on 9th August 2018 by Bloomsbury Children’s.

I’m also super excited because the very lovely people at Bloomsbury Children’s have given me three copies of The Dodo Made Me Do It to give away! Find out more below!


The Dodo Made Me Do It – Jo Simmons

IMG_6577

Danny longs for adventure – or just a super-cool summer holiday, for once – but every year he is shipped off to the quiet village of Kinoussie in Scotland to stay with his gran. Nothing ever ever happens in Kinoussie – except his gran makes him eat a lot of porridge, and the only person to hang out with is science-mad Susie, who is more interested in watching programmes about tapeworms than finding fun!

But when Danny hears about a shipwreck just off the coast, his adventure really begins and when he discovers a dodo (of all things!), Danny certainly gets more than he bargains for! Trying to keep the dodo fed, safe and quiet is a mammoth task and Danny’s lies and excuses are soon spinning out of control. Why had he ever wished for something more exciting to happen?

A hilarious tale of wish fulfilment gone wrong that every child will relate to – perfect for fans of Pamela Butchart, My Brother Is a Superhero and David Baddiel’s The Parent Agency.

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing PLC
ISBN: 9781408877777
Number of pages: 304


Jo Simmons

ouFjIm5b_400x400
(Image credit: https://twitter.com/joanna_simmons)

Jo Simmons lives in Brighton with her husband Steve and their two children, George and Dylan. They share their home with a dog called Betty and a cat called Pickle (before you ask – no, they don’t get on. Pickle lives upstairs; Betty lives downstairs).

Jo studied English at Warwick University and journalism at Cardiff University. She has been a journalist for a really long time, but the Pip Street children’s books are her first go at fiction.

Jo likes sleeping, running and eating ice cream straight from the pot, though not all at the same time, of course. That would be silly. And impossible.


Sheena Dempsey

DEMPSEY-S-200x288

Sheena Dempsey is an exciting talent. She is most known for being the illustrator of the pigeontastic Dave Pigeon series (Faber & Faber) written by Swapna Haddow, as well as the illustrator of Fearne Cotton’s debut children’s book Yoga Babies (Andersen Press). Yoga Babieshas sold in nine territories and the second title in the series will be published in 2018. It has recently been shortlisted for the Sheffield Children’s Book Awards 2018.

Sheena is also illustrator of Billy Button the Telegram Boy (Barrington Stoke) written by Sally Nicholls, which was shortlisted for the Book of the Year Award by Children’s Books Ireland.


Huge thanks to Jo, Lizz, Emily and all at Bloomsbury Children’s UK for inviting me to host this totally awesome cover reveal, I can’t wait to get my hands on a copy!


Mr E

📚


The Dodo Made Me Do It is available to pre-order online from AmazonWaterstones or from any good bookshop.

IMG_6577


Giveaway!

The very lovely people at Bloomsbury Children’s have kindly given me three copies of The Dodo Made Me Do It to give away!

If you’d like to be in with a chance of winning one of these copies of this superb book, simply retweet (RT) this tweet!

IMG_6577

 

Cover Reveal & Giveaway: Secrets of a Sun King – Emma Carroll (Illustrated by Julian De Narvaez & designed by Emma Eldridge): Out 2nd August 2018!

Today, I’m absolutely delighted to exclusively reveal the cover of Emma Carroll’s eagerly-anticipated Egyptian novel, Secrets of a Sun King which will be published on 2nd August 2018 by Faber Children’s.

I’m also super excited because the very lovely people at Faber Children’s have given me five copies of Secrets of a Sun King to give away! Find out more below!


Secrets of a Sun King – Emma Carroll

Secrets of a Sun King

It’s November, 1922. In a valley in Egypt the tomb of a long dead pharaoh is about to be discovered.

The world watches and waits for news with baited breath. Thirteen-year-old Lilian Kaye, who lives in a flat above a shop in London, is eagerly following the story. One morning the news takes a sinister turn: a man- a famous Egyptologist- disappears. All that remains of him are his feet. Then Lil’s grandfather is taken suddenly ill, and when a mysterious package turns up for him from the Egyptologist, Lil starts to believe there is truth to the rumours of a pharaoh’s curse.

Publisher: Faber & Faber
ISBN: 9780571328499
Number of pages: 320


Emma Carroll

7062845-2

After years of teaching English to secondary school students, Emma now writes full time. She graduated with distinction from Bath Spa University’s MA in Writing For Young People. In another life Emma wishes she’d written ‘Rebecca’ by Daphne Du Maurier. She lives in the Somerset hills with her husband and three terriers.


Julian De Narvaez

Julian-De-Narvaez-Studio-1(Image credit: https://folioart.co.uk/in-the-studio-julian-de-narvaez/)

Julian is an illustrator from Bogotá, Colombia, South America. Julian De Narvaez begins his drawings in pen and China ink, gradually assembling and colouring the images digitally. This process lends his illustrations a contemporary, eclectic feel, though with a surprisingly fine, traditional quality. This quirkiness is sought after for its engaging richness.


Huge thanks to Emma, Hannah, Sarah and all at Faber Children’s for inviting me to host this stunning cover reveal, I can’t wait to get my hands on a copy!


Mr E

📚


Secrets of a Sun King is available to pre-order online from Amazon, Hive, Waterstones or from any good bookshop.

Secrets of a Sun King


Giveaway!

The very lovely people at Faber Children’s have kindly given me five copies of Secrets of a Sun King to give away!

If you’d like to be in with a chance of winning one of these copies of this superb book, simply retweet (RT) this tweet!

Copies to be sent to winners when available from Faber Children’s, near or on publication on 2nd August 2018.

Secrets of a Sun King