Blog Tour (Review & Guest Post): Warrior Boy – Virginia Clay

Warrior Boy Jacket
‘Absorbing and captivating… it’s so immersive, it’s like you’re in the African savannah yourself.’

Rating: ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐

Title: Warrior Boy
Author: Virginia Clay (@VClayAuthor)
Publisher: Chicken House (@chickenhsebooks)
Page count: 256
Date of publication: 6th September 2018
Series status: N/A
ISBN: 978-0857636409

Perfect for Year 6 & Year 7.

#3Words3Emojis:
1. Maasai 🇹🇿 🇰🇪
2. Poachers 🔫
3.  Warrior 🛡️


London schoolboy Ben is heading for Kenya to meet his Maasai family. But how is an outsider like him going to fit in?

When he meets his cousin Kip, he discovers they share more than he thought – if only Ben can keep up.

Together, the boys must survive the African savannah: hunt for food, defend elephants from poachers – and even face the king of the beasts. Does Ben have what it takes to be a twenty-first-century warrior?


Review: Set deep in the African savannah, Warrior Boy tells the tale of Ben, a London schoolboy about as far removed from a tribal lifestyle as he can be, visiting the homeland of his father. As he travels to Africa with his conservationist mother, he finds himself in for a few shocks to say the least.

As he confronts his biggest fears within moments of arriving (including taking part in a ritual that ends up showing he has far more in common with his family than he so realises), he soon knows he’s in for more than he bargained when he comes across poachers who seem to have it in for his family and give them more than a serious warning to let them carry on poaching…

Can Ben – who already feared the lack of acceptance from his father’s family – defend the savannah’s animals from these callous poachers, fit in to the tribe and follow in his father’s footsteps to become a warrior? Only time will tell.

Thanks to Virginia’s own experiences, this is written in such an absorbing and captivating way that’s so immersive you’ll really feel the mix of the soaring heat and the pulsating dangers of the grasslands making it feel like you’re experiencing the savannah for yourself.


Boys and Reading

The most surprising but yet thrilling thing I have noticed since Warrior Boy’s release, has been the number of parents who have told me, having read the book, how excited they are that their son might start reading now. Of course, it’s wonderful that anyone should have such high hopes for my story, but also shocking because I hadn’t realized boys were not reading in such vast numbers.

Perhaps I have been slightly fooled by the phenomenal success of David Walliams; he has done so much to encourage boys to read. And whilst I hear lots of parents – and writers – say they are fed up with his monopoly hold on the market, for every one of those, there are two teachers who adore him. When you have a student who will do anything to avoid reading, but encounters DW and reads one of his books in two days, quite frankly you could fall down and worship at his feet.

But it has been ten years now since The Boy in the Dress was first published, which is probably a good time to take stock. And I am wondering whether Walliams hasn’t just turned boys who don’t read, into boys who read David Walliams, when we really want them to be getting a varied literary diet.

So how can we help them be braver about approaching new titles? The children’s author Chris Bradford says it’s all about finding the right subject to fit the boy:

“If all they ever play is an Xbox, perhaps start them on Game Boy by Alan Durrant. If they’re into sports, challenge them with Tom Palmer’s Football Academy series or his award-winning Ghost Stadium. If they’re interested in technology or science, connect them with Dot Robot by Jason Bradbury or Itch by Simon Mayo.

As a child, I read everything from L.M Montgomery to Tolkien but research shows that girls are more likely to try a wider range of subjects than boys and to get the latter sailing away from the warm, familiar waters of Walliams and into uncharted waters, we need to find subject matter they are passionate about.

Bradford continues, “The key element here is to plug into their everyday interests and let them live the book both in their minds and in their lives. Remember, every boy wants to be the hero!”

So where does this leave Warrior Boy? Are there any boys out there who have an obsession with spear throwing and warthog wrestling? It certainly has a hero at its heart, and I think this could be the key. All readers – boys and girls – need to identify with the main character enough to feel they could overcome the potential threat. The hero in my story faces a formidable threat in the form of elephant poaching. Will parents’ hopes be realised for their sons to read Warrior Boy? I certainly hope so!


Virginia Clay, author of Warrior Boy

WARRIOR BOY by Virginia Clay out now in paperback (£6.99, Chicken House)

 Connect with Virginia on twitter @VClayAuthor and find out more at http://www.chickenhousebooks.com


Big thanks to Laura Smythe and Chicken House for sending me a copy of this brilliant book and for inviting me to join in with the Warrior Boy blog tour.
Extra thanks to Virginia for writing her guest post!

Mr E
📚

Warrior Boy is now available to order online or from any good bookshop.


Warrior Boy blog tour banner
Be sure to check out the other dates and other bloggers for more reviews and guest posts on the Warrior Boy blog tour this week!

Blog Tour (Review) & Giveaway!: Storm Witch – Ellen Renner

I’m delighted to feature on the book birthday and publication date of Storm Witch by Ellen Renner today. I am equally delighted to be able to offer a giveaway for a copy of Storm Witch and you can find out more about winning it below!

StormWitch_fullcvr.jpg

‘A strong story that had me gripped in an instant and has left me wanting for more with each and every chapter…’

Rating: ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐

Title: Storm Witch
Author: Ellen Renner (@Ellen_Renner)
Publisher: Nosy Crow (@NosyCrowBooks)
Page count: 256
Date of publication: 6th September 2018
Series status: First in the four-book series
ISBN: 978-0857636409

Perfect for Year 5, Year 6 & Year 7.

#3Words3Emojis:
1. Elementals 🌬️
2. Storm 🌩️
3.  Magic ✨


Much is needed from you.
Learn what it is!
Now go, Storm-child.
Remember my words…

Storm’s always been different. She has a boy’s name, a strange fear of water and everyone says her family is cursed. But her arrows fly so straight and true, it’s as if they’re helped by great magic… When Storm’s island home comes under attack from the Drowned Ones, will Storm’s magic save them all? Or will it destroy everything?


In many books and literary worlds, you will encounter a Chosen One. Harry Potter for instance. But in Storm Witch, you must meet Storm. You could say that Storm is one of a kind. Unique within her community. A girl with a boy’s name. Teased for it but exhibiting powers that no-one – not even the Elders of the island – can begin to understand.

da1d799c-b9e0-48d7-9c2d-f39c635b135e._CR0,0,970,300_PT0_SX970__.png.jpeg

Turning thirteen, or should I say Thirteen-year, is a landmark achievement for the children of Yanlin as they must undertake The Choosing and be claimed by one of the almighty Elementals… but things don’t quite go to plan for our Storm. With four Elementals all vying for her, will she be a Child of Air or a Child of Water? Or will she end up being a Child of Earth or Fire?

Watch out for the Drowned Ones too – a wieldy gang of pirates that roam the seas and are ready to attack. Just as Storm is about to say goodbye to one of her friends who has to join the men of the island on a six-month long boat trip… they strike and leave Yanlin a different place to how it started. But can Storm use her powers for the good of her community? Even if she has to go against what is deemed as right.

0dce6ffa-a740-4045-9958-8afaaee47189._CR0,0,970,300_PT0_SX970__.png.jpeg
In Storm Witch, Ellen Renner has created a fantasy with no limits and has made herself an author to watch. Powerful, riddled with dilemma and fiercely magical in all the right places, this is a strong story that had me gripped in an instant and has left me wanting for more with each and every chapter. So I can’t wait for the next book even though book one – this one – has only just been published today!

‘A strong story that had me gripped in an instant and has left me wanting for more with each and every chapter…’


Big thanks to Siân Heap and Nosy Crow for sending me a copy of this superbly-written book and for inviting me to join in with the blog tour.

Mr E
📚


StormWitchCVR.jpg
Storm
 Witch
 by Ellen Renner is published on 6th September by Nosy Crow in paperback priced £6.99

Storm Witch is available to online or from any good bookshop now.


Giveaway!

StormWitchCVR.jpg
So to celebrate the publication of Storm Witch today, I am delighted to say that Nosy Crow has kindly given me one copy of Storm Witch to giveaway to one of my followers on Twitter. If you’d like a chance of winning this superb prize, simply retweet (RT) this tweet!


Storm Witch Blog Tour Banner.jpg
Be sure to check out the other dates and other bloggers for more reviews and posts on the Storm Witch blog tour this week!

Guest Post: Sparking Imagination: the Unpredictable Influence of Children’s Books – Harriet Muncaster (Isadora Moon Makes Winter Magic)

To celebrate the publication today of the next book in the very successful Isadora Moon series, Isadora Moon Makes Winter Magic,
I’m absolutely delighted to welcome Harriet Muncaster to The Reader Teacher today!

Without further ado, here’s Harriet’s guest post ‘Sparking Imagination: the Unpredictable Influence of Children’s Books’ where she talks about the benefits of reading for children; how even the smallest idea in a story can inspire a big one and her own mascot…

Sparking Imagination: the Unpredictable Influence of Children’s Books

We all know that reading has lots of benefits for children, not least improved language and literacy abilities. But reading a range of stories helps to expose children to different ideas that can spark their imagination in unpredictable ways. When a child reads a book, they’re stepping inside a whole new world, and coming across ideas they may never have been exposed to before. A tiny detail or action in any book could really resonate with a particular child, even if dozens of others would just skim over it. And there’s no knowing what that could be.

the suitcase kid

For me, The Suitcase Kid by Jacqueline Wilson contained just such a small idea that inspired me in a big way. In The Suitcase Kid, a little girl’s parents are getting divorced and she is finding this change hard to deal with. In truth I only vaguely remember the events of the main plot, perhaps because I’m fortunate enough not to have first-hand experience of this situation. I’m sure for many children who have been in a similar situation, reading the story would offer relatability and catharsis.

However, even though the story hasn’t stayed with me over the years since I read it, one of the ways the little girl tried to cope with the divorce has. You see, she got a little Sylvanian Families rabbit called Radish and decided it would become her ‘mascot’. This meant she treated it like a real, living friend who she took everywhere with her. She took Radish on adventures and made things for her, like a little boat she could go down the stream in. Here the girl is playing with Radish in the bathroom:

“She loves the bathroom. It’s her favourite best ever place. Don’t forget she’s only four centimetres tall. The basin and the bath are her very own Leisure Pool. I generally fix up a superslide by knotting Paula’s tights together and hanging them from the door hook to the bath tap. Radish hasn’t got a very slippery bottom so I soap her a lot to make her slide satisfactorily. This means Paul’s tights get a bit soapy too but that can’t be helped.”

Radish doesn’t even feature on every page, but I just found the idea of having a little character you can make things for and have adventures with so inspiring. As soon as I finished reading The Suitcase Kid I decided I had to have my own ‘mascot’. I got a Sylvanian Families ginger cat and called it Fleur. You can see her here:

Fleur the mascot

From there, the game of mascots grew and developed and I got my friends involved. At the peak of the game there were five of us, each with our own mascots. We would make clothes and accessories for our mascots, take them with us wherever we went, and throw parties for them. The most important rule was that everything they had needed to be real and to work. So, for example, they couldn’t have dolls house food: it had to be actually edible. Every mascot had to have a place to live as well, so we all made special bedrooms for our mascots.

Taking the game further, I started creating mascot magazines for my friends and me to read. These included photographs and stories of the mascots’ adventures, quizzes, and instructions for making things like clothes, patchwork quilts and mascot toothbrushes. I spent ages on these things, and loved every second of it. Even as my friends moved on to new games, I kept on with my mascots, and even now I still have a mascot:

Vinetta in a boat
And you can still see my fascination with miniature people in the normal-sized world in some of my published books:

 

I have always loved anything miniature, especially miniature characters like Tinkerbell and the Borrowers, and I have always loved making things, so I probably would have found some similar creative outlet had I not read The Suitcase Kid. I would have made miniature clothes, or written stories about tiny people, and I certainly would have carried on playing with my Sylvanian Families.

But I might not have found something as big or as captivating as the mascots game. Not something that my friends would get involved in consistently over the course of a couple of years, or that inspired me to create my own magazines. In this, The Suitcase Kid was a catalyst, a springboard for my imagination. For someone who was (and still is!) more interested in stories of fairies and the fantastic, a book about a child dealing with parental divorce wouldn’t necessarily be an obvious choice, but I got something from it much more impactful than anyone might have predicted.

I suppose my message then to parents, teachers, and readers of all ages, is that you never know what new ideas and inspirations you could find between the covers of a given book. So take a gamble; try something new; give your child something they may or may not choose for themselves. I only read The Suitcase Kid because it was a gift, but for all the hours and hours of fun I had playing mascots afterwards, I’m so glad I did!


Harriet Muncaster

 

Harriet Muncaster is the author and illustrator of the international bestselling Isadora Moon young fiction series. Her latest book, Isadora Moon Makes Winter Magic, is available in the UK from September 6th.

You can follow her mascots’ latest adventures on Instagram, see what Harriet has been up to on Facebook  and Twitter, and find a selection of Isadora Moon activities for home and school on her website.

Cover Reveal: Matt Millz Stands Up! – Harry Hill & Giveaway!

Today, I’m delighted to exclusively reveal the cover of Matt Millz Stands Up!, the eagerly-awaited sequel to Harry Hill’s fantastically funny Matt Millz, which will be published on the 18th October 2018 by Faber Children’s.

As if I’m not super excited already, I’m even more excited because the very lovely people at Faber Children’s have given me three sets of both books (Matt Millz & Matt Millz Stands Up!) to give away!
Find out more below!

9780571345687
Title: Matt Millz Stands Up!
Author: Harry Hill (@HarryHill)
Illustrator: Steve May (@stevemaythe1st)
Publisher: Faber Children’s (@FaberChildrens)
Page count: 464
Date of publication: 18th October 2018
Series status: Second in the Matt Millz series
ISBN: 978-0571345687


Matt did it! His performance at the T Factor has given him the fame he dreamed of. Kitty is getting more gigs booked in with a whole new stable of comedic acts. Unfortunately, Matt hasn’t had time to come up with new jokes so it isn’t long before he is greeted with the worst heckle for a comedian: ‘heard it before!’. But when Kitty suggests he takes a break to work on his routine, Matt can’t stand to go back to his normal life. So he signs up with the stylish Excalibur Agency, brushing his concerns (and Kitty) aside. A life of celebrity awaits! But it doesn’t take long for the shine to wear off and when they try and force him on to his first Live At the Apollo, without any prepara- tion and no new jokes, how can Matt save himself from the ultimate humiliation?


Another comic caper that every 9-11 year old aspiring comedian will love, packed full of heart, humour and dos and don’ts!


Harry Hill

IMG_5D2AF26B3C8A-1.jpeg(Photo credit: https://www.faber.co.uk/author/harry-hill/)

Harry Hill is a BAFTA winning comedian and world class swingball player. Born in Woking in 1964, he holds a med- ical degree from the University of London. His books include Flight from Deathrow and Tim the Tiny Horse. He has been a stand-up since the early 90s, and TV shows he’s created and starred in include Harry Hill’s TV Burp and Harry Hill’s Alien Fun Capsule, while he’s also the voice of You’ve Been Framed.


Steve May

Steve_May_img_04341508940966(Photo credit: http://www.picassopictures.com/picasso-pictures/directors/steve-may)

Steve May is an animation director & freelance illustrator based in London (UK). He was born in sunny Hastings & studied painting & film-making at Trent Polytechnic (1988-91) and after several years working as an illustrator / animator, a roady for Nirvana (once) & aspiring (but unsuccessful ) pop star gained an MA in Animation at the Royal College of Art (1999-2001)

As an illustrator he has produced high quality illustration work for a variety of clients including Marks & Spencer, Harper Collins, The GuardianThe Economist, Puffin & Faber amongst many others.


Huge thanks to Sarah and all at Faber Children’s for giving me the opportunity to host this fantastic cover reveal, I can’t wait to get my hands on a copy!

Mr E
📚


Pre-order and order links

Second in the series, Matt Millz Stands Up! is available to pre-order online from Amazon, Waterstones or from any good bookshop.

9780571345687

First in the series, Matt Millz is available to order online from Amazon, Waterstones or from any good bookshop.

Image 16-08-2018 at 16.43


Giveaway!

If you’d like to be in with a chance of winning one of three sets of both books, Matt Millz and Matt Millz Stands Up!, retweet (RT) this tweet!

Ends 23/8, UK only.

Copies to be sent to winners when available from Faber Children’s, close to publication in October.

 

Sneak Peek: The Twitches Meet a Puppy (Meet the Twitches 3) & Giveaway: Meet the Twitches Trilogy

I regularly recommend Hayley Scott’s Meet the Twitches series of books on Twitter, particularly to teachers who teach Year 2, Year 3 & Year 4, so I’m really excited to have been asked to host a sneak peek of Hayley’s third novel in the series, The Twitches Meet a Puppy – gorgeously illustrated in full colour by Pippa Curnick – which will be published on the 4th October by Usborne.


Giveaway!

I am also incredibly fortunate that Usborne have kindly given me two signed sets of the Meet the Twitches trilogy (3 books: Meet the Twitches, The Twitches Bake a Cake; The Twitches Meet a Puppy) to giveaway. Please see below for the giveaway! ⬇️


Teacup House 3 FRONT_RGB

Open up the Teacup House – and meet four little rabbit heroes with big ideas!

Watch out, Twitches – Stevie’s got a furry visitor. The teacup house is turned upside down when a bouncy puppy comes to stay! Silver and Mama Bo hide in the garden, and meet a creature who needs their help.

Now it’s Twitches to the rescue…

Twitches-1Twitches-2Twitches-3


Hayley Scott

ycUMR_XP_400x400(Picture credit: https://www.twitter.com/bookshaped)

Hayley has always loved stories. She grew up near Watership Down, and one of her favourite things to do was visit the big hill to watch the rabbits hopping in and out of their burrows. She’s always loved really small things too. When she was little she used to make tiny furniture for fairy houses, setting them out in scooped out hollows in her back garden. To this day she’s sure the fairies used them…

Hayley lives in Norfolk. Teacup House is her debut series for young readers.

You can find out more about Hayley on Twitter: @bookshaped


Pippa Curnick

g2sSkc5j_400x400(Picture credit: https://www.twitter.com/PippaCurnick)

Pippa Curnick is an illustrator, designer, bookworm and bunny owner. She gets her inspiration from walking in the woods in Derbyshire, where she lives with her partner and their son.  Pippa grew up in Essex and studied at Camberwell College of Art before graduating from the University of Derby with a First Class degree in illustration.
Pippa also enjoys puppet and model making.

You can find out more about Pippa on her website or on Twitter: @PippaCurnick


Meet the Twitches Trilogy Signed Giveaway!

If you’d like to enter this giveaway, simply RT this tweet!


Order links

Third in the series, The Twitches Meet a Puppy is available to order online or from any good bookshop.

Teacup House 3 FRONT_RGB


Second in the series, The Twitches Bake a Cake is available to order online or from any good bookshop.

d13c7477fe688b6666eb5ac7631e68a145d3bcfd-2


First in the series, Meet the Twitches is available to order online or from any good bookshop.

f1404770e79afb5d9766b3e0582469e16217e881-2


Big thanks to Liz, Hayley and Usborne for giving me the opportunity to share a sneak peek of their fantastic books and to host this brilliant giveaway!

Mr E
📚

Author Q&A: The Mapmakers’ Race – Eirlys Hunter with Julia Eccleshare

I am delighted to host this Q&A between Eirlys Hunter, author of The Mapmaker’s Race and Julia Eccleshare, one of children’s literature leading figures and currently Editor-at-Large with LoveReading4Kids.
In this blog post, Eirlys discusses writing for children, and the differences between that and writing for adults; her Welsh heritage (which is pretty apt to appear on my blog with being Welsh myself) and writing fantasy stories.

Eirlys Hunter and Julia Eccleshare are schoolfriends who both ended up in the children’s book world—on opposite sides of the world. On the release of Eirlys’ first children’s novel in the UK, The Mapmakers’ Race, we asked them to have a small conversation about children’s books.

Eirlys Hunter is a London-born fiction writer who lives in Wellington, New Zealand. She has published seven books for children as well as a novel and short stories for adults. Hunter teaches Writing for Children at the International Institute of Modern Letters at Victoria University (New Zealand’s most prestigious creative writing school).

Julia Eccleshare is a journalist and writer on children’s books, and the former children’s book editor for the Guardian. She published 1001 Children’s Books You Must Read Before You Grow Up in 2009.

‘I’ve known Julia since we were three, but we became close friends when we were in the same classes in years 12 & 13. We had holidays at her parents’ cottage in Wales and used to go for long walks across the hills, talking about books.’ —Eirlys Hunter

JE: You grew up in the UK in what was thought of as ‘a golden age of children’s literature’. Do you think that influenced your decision to become a writer, especially your decision to write for children?

EH: I’m sure it did, though of course I had no idea of how lucky I was. The children’s library up the road had a constant stream of exciting new books and my sister and I had Alan Garner, Joan Aiken, Philippa Pearce, Susan Cooper, William Mayne, Leon Garfield and Rosemary Sutcliff on our bookshelf.

Nowadays, reading adult novels gives me intellectual pleasure, but for emotional satisfaction and total immersion in another world I still prefer reading children’s books. I have written for adults and I may do again, but when I write for children I feel connected to the period in my life when stories were the only thing that mattered.

JE: Apart from the obvious things about what the characters are able and allowed to do, can you identify any differences between writing for adults and writing for children?

EH: You can write about any subject for children, but there are differences between how you write for children and adults (and by children, I mean pre-teens—writing for young adults is something else again). Of course, there are exceptions to undermine every generalisation, but for me the most important feature of a book for children is that it should have a child’s eye at its centre.

This probably means a child, or a childlike character, but it also means a sense of wonder. So much of children’s experience is new, extraordinary and inexplicable, and children’s writers have to reflect that.

Also, adult readers may be prepared to wade through pages of introspection, but children usually aren’t. Child characters may be thoughtful or dreamy, but they shouldn’t spend a lot of time reflecting until they’re teenagers. Children in books have to be active; they have to be doing.

And children’s books must end, if not entirely happily, at least hopefully.

JE: Does your Welsh heritage and your love for the remote Welsh countryside ever provide a landscape for your stories?

EH: Often! Setting is so important; it provides a mood as well as a stage for the action. There is a small corner of Wales that is in my DNA and I can’t keep out of my writing. The Mapmakers’ Race isn’t set in a named country but the landscape is a blend of the South Island of New Zealand and Snowdonia in North Wales.

JE: When did you discover you were a storyteller and writer? Did you start by writing for your own children or do you write to entertain yourself?

EH: I write because it’s an addiction. I used to make small books, and my parents must have noticed because they gave me an ancient typewriter for Christmas when I was ten. I began my first novel, painstakingly clacking out each letter, but it took two long pages for my heroine to get dressed and have breakfast; I wanted to write a realist novel but had no idea how to skip the reality of toast and tooth-brushing. In my teens I wrote poetry, and what I thought of as scenes—they were short stories really. It was a surprise to be praised for these at secondary school, because in primary school my writing was only ever singled out for poor spelling and wonky margins. As a teenager I kept a diary full of high emotion, and for many years I wrote to find out what I thought and felt.

I started writing for an audience when the last of my four children went to kindergarten, and I wrote for children rather than adults because that’s what I knew best; that’s what I’d been reading most of for so long. And children’s books tended to be shorter and seemed more manageable. I did try to write one novel specifically for my son, but the whole process took so long that he was practically grown-up by the time it was in print. I’d say that I was inspired by my children, but really I write for myself, because I have to.

JE: Do you imagine yourself in stories? In which case, which character from a children’s story would you most like to be?

EH: I always imagined myself in stories when I was young, sailing with Nancy and Peggy,
or languishing in the attic with poor Sarah Crewe. When I was older I spent a long time being Cassandra Mortmain in I Capture the Castle. Now I’d most like to be Lyra Belacqua or Malcolm Polstead, Philip Pullman’s brave, loyal, quick-witted heroes. Or, on less adventurous days, I’d like to be Orlando the Marmalade Cat.

JE: Writing fantasy novels for children has been very popular for the last 20 years, not least because of the success of JK Rowling. What is so attractive about writing fantasy and what opportunities does it give a writer?

I think many writers have been forced into writing fantasy because the reality of most contemporary children’s lives is so boring. They’re driven everywhere, closely timetabled and monitored, and spend so much time looking at their screens. Writers write fantasy because it’s the only way to get rid of the adults in a child’s life without causing major trauma (not that there’s anything wrong with writing about trauma, but then it’s trauma that drives the story). Fantasy may also be the only way to give child characters time to muck about and observe the world, and the opportunity to explore and take risks.

It’s impossible to imagine a contemporary realist novel in which the children have the kind of adventures that were standard in stories of a generation ago. Child welfare agencies would be called in if any contemporary children were observed to be unsupervised
for whole days at a time like the Famous Five or the Swallows and Amazons (and they didn’t wear life jackets!). It seems that only neglected children are free to have real world adventures nowadays. If a writer wants to give their child characters agency and a happy, functional family they have to write fantasy. (Historical fiction can serve the same purpose, but that involves research. I prefer making it all up.)

Fantasy doesn’t only allow child characters autonomy, it also gives writers autonomy.
I’ve been struggling with a contemporary YA novel in which social media is crucial,
but technology and the way it’s used by teens changes faster than I can keep up. In
The Mapmakers’ Race I not only ditched the parents but was free to ditch any aspect of contemporary life that limited my characters’ experience, or that I found hard to imagine, or intrinsically uninteresting. My children lose their mother on page one, but no one intervenes. They must manage without money or any means of communication. They have the technological skills they need for the race but soon discover just how many life-skills they’re missing. But they survive, and grow, and have fun.


The Mapmakers’ Race is out now in paperback (£6.99, Gecko Press)

Find out more at www.geckopress.com and on Twitter: @geckopress


Thanks to Laura Smythe for inviting me to host this exclusive and very enjoyable interview for this brilliantly-written book.

Mr E
📚

Blog Tour (Review): Baker Street Academy: Sherlock Holmes and the Baker Street Curse – Sam Hearn

image001
‘A highly engaging mystery… Sherlock is no doubt one of our nation’s favourite detectives and I can guarantee that this young Sherlock will be one of our young nation’s favourite detectives to read about.’

Rating: ⭐⭐⭐⭐

Title: Baker Street Academy: Sherlock Holmes and the Baker Street Curse
Author & Illustrator: Sam Hearn
Publisher: Scholastic (@scholasticuk)
Page count: 160
Date of publication: 2nd August 2018
Series status: Second in the series
ISBN: 978-1407164069

Perfect for Year 3, Year 4 & Year 5.

#3Words3Emojis:
1. Mystery ⁉️
2. Ghosts 👻
3. Riddle 📜


The game is afoot! The mystery has begun (again)!

Sherlock, John and Martha are back for a new term at Baker Street Academy when they notice there’s something spooky about their school…

Can Sherlock uncover the mystery of the Baker Street ghost? Or are they all (gulp!) cursed…


Review: Sherlock, Watson, Martha are back to business in Sherlock Holmes and the Baker Street Curse, by Sam Hearn, the second book in the exciting Baker Street Academy series which will really appeal to budding young detectives and smaller Sherlocks themselves.

A highly-engaging and interesting mystery adventure for younger readers, Baker Street Curse is a delightful read for both parents (many of whom will already be Sherlock fans, who will recognise subtle references to the original stories) and children alike to read together, and also for older readers to read independently. Told through Watson’s diary, and fully illustrated throughout in a graphic novel-style format with comic-strip illustrations bursting with life, Sherlock, Watson and Martha find themselves in the middle of the most spookiest and strangest of goings-on in their school with ghosts, a long-lost curse and a riddle that takes some Sherlock-solving to get their teeth into!


But will they find out what is going on before it is too late?


It’s a great mystery that is easy to follow with some red herrings, plot twists and historical facts scattered along the way that’ll lead readers slightly astray but also bring them closer to the solution, whilst also being supported by a brilliant cast of characters that help to bring the adventure to life. For young Sherlock is just as sharp, astute and observant as we know his older character to be portrayed, and the resolute Watson and the confident Martha add a fantastic friendship dynamic that will have every young reader wanting to be Sherlock, Watson or Martha in their very own sleuthing squad.

First in the series, Sherlock Holmes and the Disappearing Diamond Mystery was one of the winners of The Fantastic Book Awards – Children’s Choice for ages 9-11, judged by children in Lancashire, and I’m sure that this sequel will also be in the running for many awards to come. I am already hoping that there’ll be a third in the series to follow and I could really imagine this series of books being made in to an animated TV series.

These Baker Street Academy books provide the perfect, modern introduction to middle-grade mysteries and to Arthur Conan Doyle’s classic characters. Sherlock is no doubt one of our nation’s favourite detectives and I can guarantee that this young Sherlock will be one of our young nation’s favourite detectives to read about.


‘A highly engaging mystery… Sherlock is no doubt one of our nation’s favourite detectives and I can guarantee that this young Sherlock will be one of our young nation’s favourite detectives to read about.’


Big thanks to Emily Burns and Scholastic for sending me a copy of this book and for inviting me to join in with the blog tour.

Mr E
📚


Baker Street Curse is available to order now online or from any good bookshop.

image001


First in the series, Disappearing Diamond Mystery is also available to order now online or from any good bookshop.

BHBBO

Blog Tour (Review): A Chase in Time – Sally Nicholls (Illustrated by Brett Helquist)

Repro_AChaseInTime_cvrHIGHRES
‘Like Downton Abbey meets Back to the Future… A Chase in Time is a breathless blast to the past that’ll leave you wanting to read more of this series and more of Sally Nicholls!’

Rating: ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐

Title: A Chase in Time
Author: Sally Nicholls (@Sally_Nicholls)
Illustrator (Cover): Brett Helquist (@BHelquist)
Publisher: Nosy Crow (@NosyCrowBooks)
Page count: 208
Date of publication: 2nd August 2018
Series status: First in the series
ISBN: 978-0857638984

Perfect for Year 3, Year 4 & Year 5.

#3Words3Emojis:
1. Time-travel ⏰
2. Mirror 🖼️
3. Cup 🏆


Alex Pilgrim is always up for adventure, so he’s super-pleased when he and his sister, Ruby, fall through their aunt’s mirror into 1912. Racing around in a scarily dangerous car, being permanently grubby and even catching a criminal or two is great fun! Now they just need to find a way to get home…


Review: Prepare to wear your finest knickerbockers, petticoats and bodices as you race back in time for this riotously-good, time-travelling read that’s like Downton Abbey meeting Back to the Future.

Alex and his sister, Ruby, are sent away to their aunt’s house for the summer holidays but this is no ordinary house as they are yet to find out for themselves… At first, it’s not looking good for Aunt Joanna as she reveals that she will have to sell her stately home as she can’t afford to keep it anymore. But can the past of Applecott House help towards its future? Only time will tell…

As Alex is suddenly drawn to a mirror that’s always been hanging in the corridor of his aunt’s house, he and Ruby find themselves to be transported in to another seemingly surreal world as they explore the Edwardian era thanks to the powers of the priceless family heirloom that becomes a portal and a passageway to their past. Luckily for them, they recognise that it’s the same house… but it’s an altogether very different (and rather exciting!) place to live as they get caught up in all kinds of ancestral adventures including vintage car-chases, antiquated traditions, theft, arson and more as they have to take on the role of time detectives to help solve the problem of a golden cup that’s gone mysteriously missing…

Sally provides a great deal of accurate and precise historical detail such as an authentic cast of characters and snippets of social history, which are perfectly complemented by Brett’s classical illustrations that are so much in keeping with the time period that it felt like they were really turning back the clock. The backdrop to the book becomes the early-twentieth century before the First World War, as it’s set mostly in 1912, and spans between the differences of then and now. There’s moments in the story when Alex and Ruby reveal what is yet to come for the characters (I’m sure you can predict what’s to come in the future years) and I admired this reflective moment within the book’s fast-paced nature.

But will the siblings find a way out of the bygone days and back home?

I particularly liked how, towards the end of the story, the use of the past and the present come together. It will make you lose track of time – but it will be time that will be very well spent – as you chase down the mystery of the golden cup and join Alex and Ruby on an adventure that they thought they’d never experience. I’m sure they’ll be eager to go back to Applecott House next summer, I know I would be!

After Things a Bright Girl Can Do and her short story, Out for the Count in Make More Noise, it’s safe to say that Sally Nicholls is soon becoming one of the leading lights to look out for in children’s historical fiction. This is another really intriguing and interesting novel from a brilliant writer that readers of all ages, particularly those moving on to chapter books, will enjoy that showcases and highlights what life would have been like in Edwardian England at the time.

Like a breathless blast to the past, this one is sure to leave you wanting more of this series and wanting to read more of Sally Nicholls.

‘Like Downton Abbey meets Back to the Future… A Chase in Time is a breathless blast to the past that’ll leave you wanting to read more of this series and more of Sally Nicholls!’


Big thanks to Siân Heap and Nosy Crow for sending me a copy of this superbly-written book and for inviting me to join in with the blog tour.

Mr E
⏰📚⏰

You can take a sneak peek and read the first chapter of A Chase in Time on the
Nosy Crow website.

A Chase in Time is available to order now online or from any good bookshop.

Repro_AChaseInTime_cvr.indd


A Chase in Time - Twitter Banner - Blog Tour v1.1
Be sure to check out the other dates and other bloggers for more reviews, posts and exclusive content from Sally Nicholls and Nosy Crow on the A Chase in Time blog tour this week!

Blog Tour (Review): Knights and Bikes – Gabrielle Kent (Illustrated by Rex Crowle)

KNIGHTS AND BIKES
‘Fast-paced, fun and full of adventure with friendship at its heart, Knights and Bikes is the kind of wheelie-good book that you’ll want to read all day and all (k)night!’

Rating: ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐

Title: Knights and Bikes
Author: Gabrielle Kent (@GabrielleKent)
Illustrator (Cover): Rex Crowle (@rexbox)
Publisher: Knights Of (@_KnightsOf)
Page count: 256
Date of publication: 1st August 2018
Series status: N/A
ISBN:978-1999642501

Perfect for Year 3, Year 4 & Year 5.

#3Words3Emojis:
1. Knights ⚔️
2. Bikes 🚲
3. Friendship 👭


Welcome to the sleepy island of Penfurzy, where nothing exciting ever really happens. OR DOES IT?

Adventure awaits Demelza and her new best friend in the whole world, Nessa, as they explore the island and uncover the mysteries of the Penfurzy Knights. With a honking pet goose sidekick, quirky islanders and a legendary treasure to find, it’s up to Nessa and Demelza to ride their bikes, solve the puzzles before them, and face down danger with frisbees, water-balloons, feathers …. and a toilet plunger.


Review: Knights and Bikes, based on a soon-to-be released crowd-funded video game of the same name, is the tale of two girls who become the bestest of friends whilst taking part in exciting, yet mysterious, treasure-hunting adventures on the island of Penfurzy – a fantasy world that any reader themselves would want to adventure in. Within the pages of this book, Gabrielle puts her own stamp on the world of the game ensuring it stays its own story: spoiler-free and original by adding in additional adventures for its characters.

Demelza, the daughter of a caravan park owner and living in her own caravan, lives a very uneventful life on the likewise uneventful island. That is until she – unconventionally – meets Nessa, a girl who at first appears to be a threat, crashing and banging through her door in the middle of the night, but soon becomes her trusty friend. As the pair (plus their pet goose, Captain Honkers who gives some mighty ‘HOOONNNKs’ to welcome readers at the start of the story just to be sure of the name) embark on all kinds of adventure whilst following in the footsteps of her mother before her, they find out what the island really has to offer as it reveals itself, its legends and its long-lost curse. Penfurzy ends up becoming an island that both Demelza and Nessa don’t want to leave behind, and I’m sure the same will be said by all of Knights and Bikes’ readers too.

Older readers will recognise a sense of 80s’ film and popular culture references (boom-boxes included!) that may make them feel rather nostalgic at points; reminiscing about their own childhoods.

Coming from a recently-launched start-up publisher Knights Of (with one goal in mind: to  publish brilliant commercial kids books with one BIG difference – creating an inclusive, diverse, fairer team to make them), there has been increasing speculation and attention directed at Knights and Bikes. So therefore it is with great delight that after reading Knights and Bikes to find that this attention and praise, on my part and many others, is thoroughly deserving and well-warranted.

As the story progresses, it is fantastic to witness the growing bond between Demelza and Nessa as they become more than just friends and more like sisters, or should I say ‘spit sisters‘. Fast-paced, fun and full of adventure with friendship at its heart, Knights and Bikes is the kind of wheelie-good book that you’ll want to read all day and all knight! With the end of the story suggesting that are plenty more quests to come, Knights Of is a publisher that is one to most definitely look out for.

I’ll end this review with a direct quotation from the book as it sums it up perfectly. Sometimes you find the best adventures. But sometimes ‘the best adventures find you‘ and that is what Knights and Bikes is all about. A book with the very best kind of adventure that deserves to find its way to many, many readers and the same could be said of its publishers, Knights Of.

‘Fast-paced, fun and full of adventure with friendship at its heart, Knights and Bikes is the kind of wheelie-good book that you’ll want to read all day and all (k)night!’


Huge thanks to Sian for inviting me to take part in this blog tour and all at Knights Of for sending me a ‘limited edition advance proof’ copy of this fantastically-written book!

IMG_9926.jpg
Mr E
⚔️📚🚲


Knights and Bikes is available to order now online or from any good independent bookshop.

Knights and Bikes cover

Guest Post: How the Books Get Made (The Great Sea Dragon Discovery – Pippa Goodhart)

To celebrate the recent publication of The Great Sea Dragon Discovery,
I’m absolutely delighted to welcome Pippa Goodhart to The Reader Teacher today!

Without further ado, here’s Pippa’s guest post ‘How the Books Get Made’ where she talks about answering one of the questions that children often ask at school visits ‘How is your book made?’ After seeing pictures of Pippa on Twitter seeing her book being made, this is a superb insight in to the often behind-the-scenes process…


THE GREAT SEA DRAGON DISCOVERY FULL COVER LH FINAL_Page_1
Title: The Great Sea Dragon Discovery

Author: Pippa Goodhart (@pippagoodhart)
Publisher: Catnip Books (@catnipbooks)
Page count: 272
Date of publication: 5th July 2018
Series status: N/A
ISBN: 978-1910611081

Perfect for Year 5 & Year 6.

#3Words3Emojis:
1. Questions❔
2. Fossils  🐚
3. Curiosity 🤔


How the Books Get Made

By Pippa Goodhart

When I do school visits one of the questions that children often ask is, ‘How did you make the book?’  After a quarter of a century of writing, and over a hundred books published, with this book I have at last seen the books being made … and it’s an amazing and exciting sight.

Let’s take The Great Sea Dragon Discovery from start to finish –

It all began with me taking an interest in the history of my home village where, in the year after Darwin published his On the Origin of Species, coprolites were being mined and fossils of ancient creatures found.  Bill began to grow as a character in my mind as I researched and wrote notes, then began writing my story.  It probably took a couple of years of me working solo before there was a draft to show a publisher.

Then comes the publisher, with an editor to guide the reworking of the text, sales people to choose the title, and a designer to create the cover, so a handful of people many months.

But the actual ‘making of the book’, printing and binding happens astonishingly fast.  At CPI Book Makers in Chatham they make more than 130 million books a year!  How?

The book files are arranged so that the printing and folding of paper will place the text for each place in the correct place and the right way up for both sides of each page.

Large flexible sheets of steel are etched with the book’s text, making plates from which the book will be printed.

Vast rolls of paper made from Finnish trees are fed into a printing machine, cascading like a waterfall between the rollers that print on both sides of the paper at one.  The machine then cuts and folds each ‘section’ of the book.

Meanwhile the colour printed card for the covers is printed elsewhere, printing four covers per sheet.

Book sections (in correct order!) are fed into the binding machine, as is the cover card.  What follows produces 3,000 books in about twenty minutes.  The compressed book pages are tipped onto their spines, then passed over rollers wet with hot glue.  Those spines are stuck to the covers, and the back and front covers folded to encase the pages.  At this stage, two books are together, head to head, as a single tall book with uncut pages.  The next process saws that in half.  Then each book is guillotined to cut the pages and give clean edges.  The books are stacked and shrink wrapped and labelled, ready to be sent to the distribution centre.

Then come the lorry and fork lift truck drivers, the pickers and more who send the books into shops and libraries.  There, bookshop staff and librarians select and display and recommend the book, bloggers review it, and people buy the book.

Only then does the book get into the hands of readers, and, as they read, into their heads.  It’s quite a journey!

Picture credit: https://twitter.com/catnipbooks


Pippa Goodhart, author of The Great Sea Dragon Discovery

Picture credit: https://www.egmont.co.uk/books/author/4/pippa-goodhart

Pippa Goodhart is a popular author of over thirty children’s books including the Winnie the Witch series and A Dog Called Flow which was shortlisted for the Smarties Prize. Pippa Goodhart’s Raven Boy was in the 2015 Booktrust Read for My School packs, while Finding Fortune was picked for the 2015 Summer Reading Challenge. Pippa is a history graduate and a former teacher and bookseller. She lives in Cambridgeshire.

Find out more about Pippa at http://www.pippagoodhart.co.uk and connect with her on Twitter @pippagoodhart.


The Great Sea Dragon Discovery by Pippa Goodhart out now in paperback!
(£6.99, Catnip)

Connect with Pippa @pippagoodhart and Catnip @catnipbooks


Huge thanks to Laura and all at Catnip for sending me an advance copy of The Great Sea Dragon Discovery and inviting me to host Pippa’s guest post! Extra thanks to Pippa for taking the time to write her really insightful and informative guest post!

Mr E
📚


The Great Sea Dragon Discovery is available to order online or from any good book shop.

THE GREAT SEA DRAGON DISCOVERY FULL COVER LH FINAL_Page_1