Cover Reveal & Book Giveaway: The International Yeti Collective – Paul Mason (Illustrated by Katy Riddell) – Out 17th October 2019!

Today, I’m absolutely ecstatic to exclusively reveal the cover of Paul Mason’s first book in a brand new series that combines adventure, empathy, and global thinking, The International Yeti Collective (illustrated by Katy Riddell and designed by Sophie Bransby) which will be published on 17th October 2019 by Stripes.


The International Yeti Collective

unnamed-13.jpg


“Without wilderness there is no yeti…there is much more behind our thirst for monsters than curiosity or escapism. There is the fear that the earth is losing the last regions where myths can flourish.”

Reinhold Messner, Mountaineer


Ella is trekking through the Himalayas with her broadcasting-explorer uncle searching for yeti, but what seems like the adventure of a lifetime is cut short when she realizes that these secretive creatures might not want to be found. Tick knows it’s against yeti law to approach humans, so when some arrive on the mountain, why does he find himself peering through the trees to get a closer look? Unbeknownst to them, their actions will set off a series of events that will threaten the existence of yeti all over the world. How can they make things right?


The International Yeti Collective draws on the worldwide myths of yeti, Bigfoot and Sasquatch, to create a fully realized society of hidden creatures on the edge of the human world. Packed with humour and excitement, this is a thrilling adventure with friendship at its heart, and with strong ecological themes – yetis help nature and keep the world in balance. Mason deftly highlights environmental conservation issues throughout this story, a subject that resonates very deeply with him and also with his readership of future change-makers, who have climate change, habitat destruction, and sustaining our planet at the forefront of their concerns.


Beautifully illustrated throughout by Ka­­ty Riddell, daughter of former Children’s Laureate Chris Riddell, The International Yeti Collective is the first in a brand new series that combines adventure, empathy, and global thinking.


Praise for The International Yeti Collective

“As a biologist, I can neither confirm nor deny the existence of yetis. To do so would endanger them the world over. This book taps into the secret lives of our mythical and very hairy cousins and takes us on an adventure like no other. Tick and his hairy friends show us what it means to work together and why we need to save the world.”

 – Professor Ben Garrod, author of ‘The Chimpanzee and Me’

 “By turns funny, moving, and action-packed, THE INTERNATIONAL YETI COLLECTIVE is a fast-moving adventure with a meditative, philosophical heart. Perfect for fans of H.S. Norup’s THE MISSING BARBEGAZI.”

– Sinéad O’Hart, author of ‘The Eye of the North’ and ‘The Star-Spun Web’

 “Super excited and looking forward to this SO much. October can’t come soon enough to see this on the shelves; one of my most eagerly anticipated releases of the year!”

– Scott Evans, @MrEPrimary

“A delightful tale of yetis, bravery and protecting nature.  This is a fast-paced, heart-warming adventure.”

– Erin Hamilton, @erinlynhamilton


RRP £6.99
ISBN 9781788950848
Format Paperback
Publisher Stripes
Age 9 – 12


Paul Mason

paulmason-1411.jpg

Photo: Emma Hughes

Paul Mason was born in London, has travelled the world, and now lives in a cottage on an island in New Zealand, with his wife and children. He has written a dozen children’s books, and some of his stories are now being used by the University of Auckland to encourage new teachers to include sustainability in their classrooms. Find Paul online: Instagram: @writerpaulmason, and Web: www.paulmasonwriter.com.


Katy Riddell

Katy Riddell grew up Brighton and was obsessed with drawing from a young age. Plenty of encouragement from her parents, both artists and illustrators, led her to spend hours writing  and illustrating her own stories, which her father (former Children’s Laureate Chris Riddell) collected throughout the years.  Since graduating with a BA Hons in Illustration and Animation from Manchester Metropolitan University, Katy has worked on a variety of commissions including Pongwiffy by Kaye Umansky and Midnight Feasting by A.F. Harrold. She loves working with children, and currently runs an art club at her local school. She lives and works in Manchester.

Find Katy online: Facebook: @kriddellillustration, and Instagram: @katyriddell_illustration.


The International Yeti Collective is available to pre-order online now from Amazon, Hive, Waterstones or from any good independent bookshop.


Huge thanks to Leilah, Paul, Katy and all at Stripes for inviting me to host this stupendously good cover reveal, I am more than YETI to get my hands on a copy!


Mr E

📚


Giveaway!

The very lovely people at Stripes have kindly given me five copies of The International Yeti Collective to give away!

unnamed-13.jpg

If you’d like to be in with a chance of being one of the first people to read this beautiful story, simply retweet (RT) this tweet!

Copies will be sent to winners when available from Stripes, as soon as possible.

Blog Tour (Review & Author Q&A): The Star-Spun Web – Sinead O’Hart (Illustrated by Sara Mulvanny)

Screen Shot 2019-02-03 at 18.37.25.png

‘A fantastic fusion of exciting, excellent and effervescent fiction that’s out-of-this-world! This is science-inspired storytelling at its stellar, supercharged best.’

Rating: ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐

Title: The Star-Spun Web
Author: Sinéad O’Hart (@SJOHart)
Illustrator (Cover): Sara Mulvanny (@saramulvanny)
Publisher: Stripes (@StripesBooks)
Page count: 384
Date of publication: 7th February 2019
Series status: N/A
ISBN: 978-1788950220

Perfect for Year 5 and Year 6.

#3Words3Emojis:
1. Science 🔬
2. Reality ✨
3. Violet 🕷️


Tess de Sousa is no ordinary orphan. When a wealthy stranger appears at Ackerbee’s Home for Lost and Foundlings claiming to be her relative, she embarks on a new life with him. She take nothing more than her pet tarantula Violet and a strange device that she was left as a baby.

But far from providing answers to Tess’s mysterious past, it becomes clear that her guardian’s interest in her is part of a terrible plan. With the future of more than one world at stake, it’s up to Tess to stop him…


Review: As a wealthy man turns up on the very doorstep that Tess de Sousa turned up on herself as a baby, she has little idea of how much her life is going to change. Going by the name of a certain Mr Cleat and claiming guardianship of her, Tess knows that this could be her last chance to find out how she came to end up living at the orphanage home of Ackerbee’s Lost and Foundlings once and for all. But all is not quite as it seems…

Imaginative and inventive – although a little anarchic and with a pet arachnid for company – Tess sets off with this stranger, spanning across a web of parallel worlds and dimensions for a multi-layered and multi-universe mystery that is the adventure of all adventures.

Every element of this tale is cleverly written: in terms of its pulsating plot; the cast of its characters: their relationships; their interactions and their interconnectedness; and the dual (sometimes tri-) narratives occurring in concurrent chapters. With a stunningly-illustrated cover by Sara Mulvanny to match, this book can do no wrong and I can predict it already garnering praise aplenty and appearing in nearly all end-of-year celebratory lists.

As the gripping suspense of this story sucks you in to the web that Tess soon finds herself tangled up in, every turn of its page makes time truly fly by with the sensation that you can travel through time yourself.

With The Star-Spun Web, Sinéad establishes herself fully on the MG stage spinning gossamer threads of alternate realities that collide with fragments of fantasy and overcoming the precarious and notoriously difficult ‘second novel syndrome’ with apparent ease. It’s as if she has story writing down to a science.

Out-of-this-world. This is science-inspired storytelling at its stellar, supercharged best. A book that is a pleasure to read and a book that can’t help but encourage reading for pleasure. Like the very best of science discoveries, I think this could be a momentous and ground-breaking read for children (and adults!) who crave a fantastic fusion of exciting, excellent and effervescent fiction.

cropped-the-star-spun-web-twitter-banner.jpeg


I’m utterly delighted to have Sinéad O’Hart, author of The Star-Spun Web, join us on The Reader Teacher today on publication week with this extra-special interview where she shares her experiences of writing, her inspirations and the best and worst things about being an author…sinead-ohart.png

  1. What was your favourite book when you were 8?
    Alan Garner’s Elidor – and it’s still my favourite book now.
  2. What are the three main things a reader will find in your books?
    Clever, determined girls; brave, ingenious boys; mortal peril!
  3. When did you start to tell stories?
    I wrote my first ‘book’ at 7, a sequel to The Little Prince complete with my own drawings, but sadly I’ve lost it. My parents said I always had a strong imagination and liked to tell stories to myself, drawing pictures to go with them, from as soon as I could talk and hold a crayon. I’ve been pleased to see my own little girl doing exactly the same!
  4. Did you always want to be a writer? Have you had different jobs before you were an author? Do you think a variety of work experiences has helped you to write?
    I always wanted to have a creative life, but I wasn’t sure for a long time exactly how I’d go about it. From the age of seven or eight, when I began to think about the sort of life I wanted to have, I knew I wanted to do something unusual, something where I could use my interest in creativity (and daydream a lot, because daydreaming is very important), but to me that could have been anything from being a visual artist to a scientist – I wanted to be a marine biologist for a long time. It wasn’t until I was a few years older, perhaps halfway through secondary school, that I realised my love for books, reading, stories and art could be made into something cohesive, and it was then I began to dream of being a writer. I’ve had lots of jobs; I’ve worked in a clothes shop, as a tourism adviser, in many different offices including a printers’ and a health centre, in a supermarket, as a trainee butcher, as a researcher, as a tutor and lecturer of English language and literature at a university, as a records manager for an English department at the same university, as a bookseller, and as a freelance proofreader. I’m sure I’m forgetting a few! And yes, of course every job I’ve done has helped me to be a writer. Everything you do in life – everything you read, see, hear, watch, and observe – can go toward helping you to be a writer. The more jobs you’ve done, the more experiences you’ve had, the more things you’ve felt and seen and heard, all help you to describe things in your stories and make them feel real. Of course this doesn’t mean you have to wait until you’re a certain age, or until you’ve done a particular amount of ‘things’, before you can write – if you want to write you can start anytime, and the earlier the better. You’re never too young to switch on your observation skills, and then you’re already well on the way. Reading books, learning from them, and using your imagination are all vital tools in a writer’s kit, and there’s no age or experience limit on those.
  5. Where do you get your ideas from, and how do you store them?
    Ideas are all around, just waiting to be plucked out of the air. I’m inspired through observation of the world around me, and I have an insatiable curiosity. I’m constantly on the lookout for strange and interesting words; sometimes I find them in newspaper articles or books, or in overheard conversations, or on signs. For me, words – particularly if they’re misspelled, or if they’re used as a pun, or if they’re unfamiliar to me – are wonderful idea-seeds. Mostly my ideas seem like tiny fragments of something bigger; I get a scene, or a character name, or a place-name, or a funny line of dialogue, and I don’t have any idea where they go or what sort of story they’ll grow into. They need careful handling until they’ve had a chance to germinate and sprout, so it’s important to have a notebook on your person all the time to keep your idea-seeds safe. However, I usually store my ideas on scraps of paper and my phone, as I never have my notebook handy when I need it!
  6. Every writer creates a story in their own unique way. Roald Dahl had an armchair in his shed, Lewis Carroll liked a standing desk and to write in purple ink. Do you have any unconventional methods, habits or superstitions when it comes to writing?
    I tend to write standing up, but not because of superstition – it’s mostly out of necessity as I have a busy little girl. I don’t have unconventional methods because I need to write in any second I can! I feel very boring now. Perhaps I should invent some strange habits, like writing with a rubber chicken tied to my head. Bok bok!

  7. How much of Sinéad O’Hart is reflected in your characters?
    Quite a lot, I think – and I reckon the same is true of any writer. I think my girl characters reflect some of my own awkwardness and social anxiety; I was a very introverted and thoughtful child, who liked to work things out in my own way, and I found, as a girl, that there weren’t many girls like me in books. I try to remedy that a bit with my stories. Some of my girl characters are deep thinkers with a strong sense of justice, girls who like to observe, and I see my child-self in those characters. In my boy characters I put my heart and vulnerability, and that’s something which comes naturally but it’s also a conscious choice, in part. I think it’s important to create boy characters with emotion and depth, and who show true bravery – which to me means doing what you need to do, even though it frightens you.
  8. You are in a library with a 10 year-old who claims that they don’t like reading… Which 3 books would you reach for to try to change their mind?
    I think I’d be there all day, offering them a new trio of books every five minutes, but at the moment: Dave Rudden’s Knights of the Borrowed Dark trilogy, which is the grippiest, most engaging, most fun and most absorbing children’s trilogy I’ve read in a long time; Peter Bunzl’s Cogheart books, which feature a wonderful heroine and a complex, layered hero, along with a clankingly good cast of mechanimals and mechanicals alike; and Jennifer Bell’s Uncommoners books, which are fast-paced and twisty, edge-of-your-seat action coupled with a brilliant, detailed world and mythology. (Yes, I know that’s technically nine books!) But ask me again in half an hour and I’ll say Sky Song, the Rose Raventhorpe books and Brightstorm… Don’t make me choose!
  9. What’s the best and worst things about being an author?
    There are loads of good things about being an author but the best is: having a job that, for the most part, fits around my child’s life, and also meeting and hearing from readers. I love getting messages from teachers, librarians and mums and dads telling me about the kids who’ve loved my stories, and I really enjoy meeting readers at school and library events. The worst is pretty bad: writing books for a living is a stressful thing sometimes, and I worry constantly that I’m not good enough, or that I’ll never get another contract. But the good things definitely outweigh the bad.
  10. Do you have any advice for budding writers?
    The first thing you need to be a writer is to remember this ABC – Always Be Curious. Pay thoughtful attention to everything you see and hear in the world around you; listen to snippets of conversation, keep your eyes peeled for the interesting and unique things you see every day, ask yourself questions and make up the answers about the people and places you come across. Then: read, read, read; read anything and everything and immerse yourself in words and stories as often as you possibly can. After that: when you start to write your own stories, write what you love; write what interests you, write the kind of books and stories you’d like to read. But the most important thing is this: never give up. Hopefully you’ll be lucky enough to have parents, siblings, and teachers who’ll support you, but sometimes you won’t. Try not to let anyone put you off writing. Do your best to protect the things you love and the things you’re interested in as much as you can. If there’s something in you which loves to read, or write, or draw, or do anything at all, then guard it and nurture it and never lose that love. You never know when it will suddenly bloom into life and bring joy to you and all around you. If you’d like to write as a career, do know this: it can take a long time, and the most important thing you can bring to it is sticking power. Don’t ever stop writing, improving, and trying your hardest!

QUICKFIRE

  1. 3 words that describe you: Confused. Curious. Reading.
  2. Favourite time of the day? I’m a night owl – evening time!
  3. 3 random facts about you: I once chopped up hearts for a living (don’t panic, they were beef hearts); I have a PhD in medieval English; I really hate balloons.
  4. Go-to snack? Rich Tea biscuits!
  5. The best advice you ever got: Love many, trust few, and always paddle your own canoe.
  6. Complete the sentence: “If I was one of the Seven Dwarves, I’d be…” all of them at once! But mostly Dopey.
  7. Superhero power of choice: The ability to hold the entirety of human knowledge in my head, like a walking library.
  8. Go-to outfit? Whatever fits and isn’t covered in last night’s dinner… Usually jeans, DM boots, and a big shirt.
  9. Your dream place to curl up with a book? Anywhere with a view of the mountains or the sea, at sunset, in a cosy well-lit window seat, with a steaming mug of tea close by. Bliss!
  10. The 3 books you’d like to get for your next birthday: The Way Past Winter by Kiran Millwood Hargrave; The Clockwork Crow by Catherine Fisher; and The Girl, the Cat and The Navigator by Matilda Woods.

Big thanks to Sinéad, Leilah and all at Stripes for inviting me to kick off The Star-Spun Web blog tour and share my thoughts and for giving me the wonderful opportunity to do its amazing cover reveal and giveaway!

Extra thanks to Sinéad for her brilliant interview!

Dxr1NmYV4AAZEqz.jpg

Be sure to check out the rest of The Star-Spun Web blog tour this week to see more exclusive guest posts and reviews!

 Mr E 

 

Cover Reveal & Book Giveaway: The Star-spun Web – Sinéad O’Hart (Illustrated by Sara Mulvanny) – Out 7th February 2019

Today, I’m incredibly excited to exclusively reveal the cover of Sinéad O’Hart’s eagerly-anticipated second novel after The Eye of the North, The Star-spun Web which will be published on 7th February 2019 by Stripes Books.

Click here to request it from Netgalley!

I’m also super delighted because the very lovely people at Stripes have given me five copies of The Star-spun Web to give away! Find out more below!


The Star-spun Web – Sinead O’Hart

unnamed
With her passion for scientific experimentation and her pet tarantula Violet, Tess de Sousa is no ordinary orphan.

When a stranger shows up at Ackerbee’s Home for Lost and Foundlings, claiming to be a distant relative come to adopt her, Tess hopes to find some answers to her mysterious origins. But as she adjusts to her new life at Roedeer Lodge, it becomes clear that Norton F. Cleat knows more about Tess – and the strange star-shaped device left with her when she was abandoned as a baby – than he’s letting on. And when Tess discovers that the Starspinner is the gateway between her world and a parallel world in which war rages, she realizes she may be the key to a terrible plan.

A plan she must stop at all costs…


Publisher: Stripes/Little Tiger Press Group
ISBN: 9781788950220
Number of pages: 384


Sinead O’Hart

sinead-ohart
(Image credit: https://sjohart.wordpress.com/about-me/)

Sinéad O’Hart was raised in a small house full of books in the south-east of Ireland. She has a degree in Medieval English and has had many careers (including butcher, bookseller and university lecturer). She now lives in County Meath, near Dublin, with her husband, their daughter and an ever-expanding book collection.

Visit sjohart.wordpress.com@SJOHart


Sara Mulvanny

c2000159c9be36719a90b2f8a759550d_400x400
(Image credit: https://twitter.com/saramulvanny)

Sara Mulvanny grew up with a paint brush in one hand and a cup of tea in the other. After studying Illustration at Kingston, Sara moved back to her North Hampshire studio which she shares with her cat, Simba. Whilst this cheeky feline tries to walk across Sara’s keyboard or balances precariously on stacked sketchbooks, Sara can be found creating her stylised pen and ink drawings, which she digitally transforms with texture and colour. Inspired by the age of Art Deco illustration and muted colour palettes, her charming illustrative style has captured the attention of many clients including Harrods, Sainsbury’s Magazine and Harper Collins.


Huge thanks to Sinéad, Leilah and all at Stripes for inviting me to host this mightily impressive cover reveal, I can’t wait to get my hands on a copy!


Mr E

📚


Preorder: The Star-spun Web is available to pre-order online from Amazon, Hive, Waterstones, WHSmith or from any good bookshop.

unnamed


Giveaway!

The very lovely people at Stripes have kindly given me five physical copies of The Star-spun Web to give away!

unnamed

If you’d like to be in with a chance of winning one of these copies of this superb book, simply retweet (RT) this tweet!

Copies to be sent to winners when available from Stripes, just before, near or on publication on 7th February 2019.